Next Up | Jennifer Scappettone

The New Writing Series presents a reading by poet, translator, and scholar Jennifer Scappettone on Thursday, April 17, 2014. The event will be held at 4:30pm in the Allen and Sally Fernald APPE space in 104 Stewart Commons and is free and open to the public. Carla Billitteri of the UMaine English Department’s faculty in poetry & poetics will introduce and host the Q&A to follow.

Jennifer Scappettone is associate professor of English and creative writing and associated faculty of Romance languages and literatures at the University of Chicago, and was the Andrew W. Mellon Post-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Modern Italian Studies for 2010-11. Her poetry collections include From Dame Quickly and the bilingual Thing Ode/Ode oggettuale.

Scappettone edited and translated Locomotrix: Selected Poetry and Prose of Amelia Rosselli (University of Chicago Press), copies of which will be available at the event.

Her study Killing the Moonlight: Modernism in Venice is forthcoming in August from Columbia University Press.

Her response to the question “What Is American about American Poetry?” is archived at the Poetry Society of America’s website.

Her essay “Garbage Arcadia: Digging for Choruses in Fresh Kills” is included in Terrain Vague: Interstices at the Edge of the Pale (Routledge).

Scappettone’s contribution to the “Our Occupations (after the Occupations)” series curated by Thom Donovan for the Poetry Foundation is archived on Harriet.

A number of talks and readings are archived on Scappettone’s PennSound author page.

Scappettone comes to Maine right after presenting “Strategic Passeism: The Invention of a Modernist in the City of Aldus” as a keynote lecture at the Pound, ID: A Convergence conference in Boise, Idaho.

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On Facebook? Consider joining the NWS group here.

The UMaine New Writing Series was founded in 1999 and is sponsored by the English Department and the National Poetry Foundation with support from the Lloyd H. Elliott Fund, the Milton Ellis Memorial Fund, the Honors College, the University of Maine Humanities Initiative, the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs & Provost, and the Cultural Affairs/Distinguished Lecture Series Committee. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the IMRC, and to donors Allen and Sally Fernald, for use of the AP/PE Black Box space. For more information contact NWS Coordinator Steve Evans at steven dot evans at maine dot edu or at 207-581-3818.

If you have a disability that requires accommodation for a NWS event, please contact Ann Smith in the office of Disability Support Service, 121 East Annex, 581-2319 (Voice) or 581-2311 (TDD).

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207-581-1226.

Next Up | Ray Halliday

The New Writing Series presents a reading by fiction writer Ray Halliday on Thursday, April 10, 2014. The event will be held at 4:30pm in the Allen and Sally Fernald APPE space in 104 Stewart Commons and is free and open to the public. Dave Kress of the UMaine Creative Writing faculty in fiction will introduce and host.

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Ray Halliday works as an English professor and editor in San Francisco. He’s also worked for a brokerage house, and for six years, as a night cabbie. A songwriter and musician, he leads The Verms.  He wrote, produced and acted in four very short films called The Existentialists. He has published stories in The Quarterly, Story Quarterly, Quarterly West, Crescent Review, and Stolen Island among others. In 1991 he was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. His stories have been characterized as minimalist. The Kid That Even the Dogs Didn’t Like (MAMMOTH books, 2013) is his first collection of stories.

“Quirky and canny, familiar and queer, accessible and resistant, Ray Halliday’s short stories evoke a nostalgia bereft of sentimentality, a loneliness without despair, and a good humor that always leaves us more than a little uneasy. Intensely interested in literary minimalism, Halliday calls up shades of Richard Brautigan and Russell Edson, but nevertheless scouts new paths for that venerable tradition.” — Dave Kress

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On Facebook? Consider joining the NWS group here.

The UMaine New Writing Series was founded in 1999 and is sponsored by the English Department and the National Poetry Foundation with support from the Lloyd H. Elliott Fund, the Milton Ellis Memorial Fund, the Honors College, the University of Maine Humanities Initiative, the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs & Provost, and the Cultural Affairs/Distinguished Lecture Series Committee. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the IMRC, and to donors Allen and Sally Fernald, for use of the AP/PE Black Box space. For more information contact NWS Coordinator Steve Evans at steven dot evans at maine dot edu or at 207-581-3818.

If you have a disability that requires accommodation for a NWS event, please contact Ann Smith in the office of Disability Support Service, 121 East Annex, 581-2319 (Voice) or 581-2311 (TDD).

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207-581-1226.

Next Up | Deb Olin Unferth

The New Writing Series presents a reading by fiction writer and memoirist Deb Olin Unferth on Thursday, April 3, 2014. The event will be held at 4:30pm in the Hill Auditorium of Barrows Hall and is free and open to the public. Fiction writer and Creative Writing faculty member Greg Howard will host.

Deb Olin Unferth is the author of the story collection Minor Robberies and the novel Vacation, winner of the 2009 Cabell First Novelist Award and a New York Times Book Review Critics’ Choice. Her memoir, Revolution: The Year I Fell in Love and Went to Join the War, was published by Henry Holt in 2011 and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her work has been featured in Harper’s Magazine, McSweeney’s, The Believer, and the Boston Review. She has received two Pushcart Prizes and a 2009 Creative Capital grant for Innovative Literature and was a Harper’s Bazaar Editors’ Choice: Name to Know in 2011. She teaches at Wesleyan University and currently lives in New York.

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On Facebook? Consider joining the NWS group here.

The UMaine New Writing Series was founded in 1999 and is sponsored by the English Department and the National Poetry Foundation with support from the Lloyd H. Elliott Fund, the Milton Ellis Memorial Fund, the Honors College, the University of Maine Humanities Initiative, the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs & Provost, and the Cultural Affairs/Distinguished Lecture Series Committee. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the IMRC, and to donors Allen and Sally Fernald, for use of the AP/PE Black Box space. For more information contact NWS Coordinator Steve Evans at steven dot evans at maine dot edu or at 207-581-3818.

If you have a disability that requires accommodation for a NWS event, please contact Ann Smith in the office of Disability Support Service, 121 East Annex, 581-2319 (Voice) or 581-2311 (TDD).

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207-581-1226.

Next Up | Christine Hume

The New Writing Series presents a reading by poet and sound artist Christine Hume on Thursday, March 27, 2014. The event will be held at 4:30pm in the Hill Auditorium of Barrows Hall and is free and open to the public. Fiction writer and Creative Writing faculty member David Kress will host.

Christine Hume is the author of three volumes of poety, Musca Domestica (Beacon, 2000); Alaskaphrenia (New Issues, 2004); and Shot (Counterpath, 2010). A chapbook with CD, Lullaby: Speculations on the First Active Sense, was released by Ugly Ducking Presse in 2008. Her most recent chapbooks are Ventifacts (Omnidawn, 2012) and Hum (Dikembe, 2013).

Hume has published, installed, and performed sonic work in galleries and at conferences such as MOCAD (Museum of Contemporary Art in Detroit), Chicago Cultural Center, SPACES Gallery in Cleveland, Centro Nacional de Cultura in Lisbon, Residency College Gallery at University of Michigan, Poetry Off the Page Symposium at University of Arizona, Small Press Fest at University of Colorado, &Now Conference at University of Buffalo, Poetry of Plays at Barnard College; and online at TextSound, Women Studies Quarterly, Requited, InDiget and on numerous radio programs.

She has performed and given lectures or workshops on sound poetry at University of Georgia, Boise State University, University of Montana, School of the Art Institute in Chicago, University of Houston, Pomona College, University of Miami, Otis School of Art and Design, and Cooper Colored Mountain Arts Center.

Hume received her BA from Penn State University, her MFA from Columbia University, and her PhD from University of Denver. She is Professor of English at Eastern Michigan University, where she directs the interdisciplinary creative writing program, co-directs BathHouse Events, and hosts Poetry Radio, which features contemporary and historic sound art, performance art, sound poetry, and collaborations between writers and musicians. She lives in Ypsilanti, Mich., with her daughter, Juna, and partner, Jeff Clark.

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On Facebook? Consider joining the NWS group here.

The UMaine New Writing Series was founded in 1999 and is sponsored by the English Department and the National Poetry Foundation with support from the Lloyd H. Elliott Fund, the Milton Ellis Memorial Fund, the Honors College, the University of Maine Humanities Initiative, the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs & Provost, and the Cultural Affairs/Distinguished Lecture Series Committee. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the IMRC, and to donors Allen and Sally Fernald, for use of the AP/PE Black Box space. For more information contact NWS Coordinator Steve Evans at steven dot evans at maine dot edu or at 207-581-3818.

If you have a disability that requires accommodation for a NWS event, please contact Ann Smith in the office of Disability Support Service, 121 East Annex, 581-2319 (Voice) or 581-2311 (TDD).

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207-581-1226.

Next Up | Tracie Morris

The New Writing Series, in collaboration with the Honors College, presents a performance by poet Tracie Morris on Thursday, March 20, 2014. The event will be held at 4:30pm in the new Black Box performance space in 104 Stewart Commons and is free and open to the public. New Writing Series coordinator Steve Evans will host.

Tracie Morris is a poet who has worked extensively as a sound poet, bandleader, actor and multimedia performer. Her sound installations have been presented at the Whitney Biennial, MoMA, Ronald Feldman Gallery, The Silent Barn, The Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning, The Drawing Center, The Gramsci Monument with Thomas Hirshhorn for the DIA Foundation and other galleries. She also leads her own eponymous band and is lead singer for Elliott Sharp’s group, Terraplane.

Morris is the recipient of numerous awards for poetry and performance and has contributed to, and been written about in, several anthologies of literary criticism. Her most recent poetry collection, Rhyme Scheme, includes a sound poetry CD. She is currently working on two books about the philosopher J.L. Austin and Black vernacular, a creative project on Ira Aldridge and recently completed tracks on 4am Always, a new recording with Terraplane, She holds an MFA in Poetry from Hunter College, has studied classical British acting technique extensively at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, and holds a PhD in Performance Studies from New York University. She is Professor and Coordinator of Performance + Performance Studies at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York.

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On Facebook? Consider joining the NWS group here.

The UMaine New Writing Series was founded in 1999 and is sponsored by the English Department and the National Poetry Foundation with support from the Lloyd H. Elliott Fund, the Milton Ellis Memorial Fund, the Honors College, the University of Maine Humanities Initiative, the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs & Provost, and the Cultural Affairs/Distinguished Lecture Series Committee. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the IMRC, and to donors Allen and Sally Fernald, for use of the AP/PE Black Box space. For more information contact NWS Coordinator Steve Evans at steven dot evans at maine dot edu or at 207-581-3818.

If you have a disability that requires accommodation for a NWS event, please contact Ann Smith in the office of Disability Support Service, 121 East Annex, 581-2319 (Voice) or 581-2311 (TDD).

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207-581-1226.

Next Up | Philip Boehm

On Tuesday, February 25, 2014, the New Writing Series presents translator, playwright, and dramatist Philip Boehm. The special Tuesday event will be held at 4:30pm in the new Black Box performance space in 104 Stewart Commons and is free and open to the public. Poet, translator, and UMaine professor Jennifer Moxley will host and introduce.

Philip Boehm has translated numerous works from German and Polish by writers including Ingeborg Bachmann, Franz Kafka, and Stefan Chwin. His translation of Gregor von Rezzori’s An Ermine in Czernopol was published by NYRB in 2012 and selected for the 2013 Helen and Kurt Wolff Translator’s Prize awarded by the Goethe-Institut Chicago. For the theater he has written plays such as Mixtitlan, The Death of Atahualpa, and Return of the Bedbug. He has received awards from the American Translators Association, the U.K. Society of Authors, the NEA , PEN America, the Austrian Ministry of Culture, the Mexican-American Fund for Culture, and the Texas Institute of Letters. His translation of Herta Müller’s The Hunger Angel won the National Translation Award in 2013. He lives in St. Louis, where he is the artistic director of Upstream Theater.

Boehm’s visit is part of a semester-long celebration of the act and art of translation that will also feature readings by Rosa Alcalá and Jennifer Scappettone (see full NWS schedule here).

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On Facebook? Consider joining the NWS group here.

The UMaine New Writing Series was founded in 1999 and is sponsored by the English Department and the National Poetry Foundation with support from the Lloyd H. Elliott Fund, the Milton Ellis Memorial Fund, the Honors College, the University of Maine Humanities Initiative, the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs & Provost, and the Cultural Affairs/Distinguished Lecture Series Committee. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the IMRC, and to donors Allen and Sally Fernald, for use of the AP/PE Black Box space. For more information contact NWS Coordinator Steve Evans at steven dot evans at maine dot edu or at 207-581-3818.

If you have a disability that requires accommodation for a NWS event, please contact Ann Smith in the office of Disability Support Service, 121 East Annex, 581-2319 (Voice) or 581-2311 (TDD).

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207-581-1226.

Next Up | Grady Awards in Creative Writing

UPDATE The Grady Awards event originally planned for Feb. 13 is now scheduled for Thursday, February 20, 2014 (same place and time).

On Thursday, February 20, the New Writing Series celebrates the winners of the 2014 Steve Grady Awards for Creative Writing, who will read from their winning manuscripts. The event will be held at 4:30pm in the Black Box APPE space in 104 Stewart Commons and is free and open to the public. This year’s judges were Anna Moschovakis (poetry) and Peter Markus (fiction), both of whom read in the New Writing Series in the spring of 2013. The event will be hosted by Creative Writing faculty members Gregory Howard, David Kress, and Jennifer Moxley. You’ll find brief biographical statements from the winners below.

Maurice Burford currently lives, writes, & raises his two cats in Bangor, Maine and is the poetry editor for HOUSEFIRE Publishing and is the co-editor of Mammoth Editions, both based in Portland, Oregon. His work has recently appeared in Similar Peaks, Shampoo, & Juked, and is forthcoming from West Wind Review. He is also the author of the chapbook An Atomic Fact (Horseless Press, 2013), Rimbaud’s / Poems (Grey Book Press, 2012) and, with his partner Jess Rowan, Prithee (Abraham Lincoln Press, 2010). Burford, who shared the 2014 Millay Prize for Poetry, won second prize in Graduate Poetry for “Frostbite” and “The Optimist.” The judge was Anna Moschovakis.

Alexander Champoux is Coordinator of the Writing Program and Farnham Writers’ Center at Colby College in Waterville, Maine. He graduated from Trinity College in 2011 with a B.A. in English: Creative Writing (minors in Mythology; Writing, Rhetoric, and the Media Arts), and is so excited to be back on the student side of education again, pursuing his M.A. in English: Composition and Pedagogy. Champoux won second prize in Graduate Fiction for “Imperfect Tense.” The judge was Peter Markus.

Sarah Cook has other interests. Proof of such can be found at or is forthcoming in Poor Claudia, SHAMPOO, Gesture, Illuminati Girl Gang, and Gaga Stigmata, among others. Cook won first prize in Graduate Poetry for “Poem in response to snow and other things.” The judge was Anna Moschovakis.

Reuben Dendinger grew up in the Black Hills of South Dakota, but somehow ended up at the University of Maine where he currently studies English and History. He lives with his wife, Maia, and his cat, Trismegistus. Since boyhood he has pursued an amateur study of cryptozoology, and in his spare time he writes fantasy stories. His spirit animal is the mountain lion. Dendinger won second prize in Undergraduate Fiction for “Chretien’s Tattoos” and “The Fresco at Diatomacea.” The judge was Peter Markus.

Seth Dorman is a Maine native in his final undergraduate year. He is majoring in English, with a concentration in creative writing, and minoring in history. He works as an opinion columnist for The Maine Campus, a tutor in the Writing Center, poetry editor of The Open Field, and editor-in-chief of the student publication Doulos, a journal of Christian thought. Dorman won first prize in Undergraduate Fiction for “The Creation of Adam” and “Lauds.” The judge was Peter Markus. He also won second prize in Undergraduate Poetry for “O New Jerusalem!” The judge was Anna Moschovakis.

Sean Miller has been posing as a Maine native for over twenty years, though only to those who don’t ask otherwise. He is a recent graduate of the University of Maine, which has left him gainfully unemployed. This leaves him plenty of time for reading books and drinking whiskey. He used to be a poet, and still is. Miller won first prize in Undergraduate Poetry for “in order   to.” The judge was Anna Moschovakis.

Rose Wednesday is an MA student of fiction at the University of Maine. She has been published in the Armchair Aesthete and Stolen Island and has an upcoming story on Timber Magazine Online. She is current fiction editor of Stolen Island. When not in Maine, she spends her time in Virginia with her partner and their feral cats. Wednesday won first prize in Graduate Fiction for “The Artists, from an Unnatural History of Humans in Love.” The judge was Peter Markus.

# # #

On Facebook? Consider joining the NWS group here.

The UMaine New Writing Series was founded in 1999 and is sponsored by the English Department and the National Poetry Foundation with support from the Lloyd H. Elliott Fund, the Milton Ellis Memorial Fund, the Honors College, the University of Maine Humanities Initiative, the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs & Provost, and the Cultural Affairs/Distinguished Lecture Series Committee. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the IMRC, and to donors Allen and Sally Fernald, for use of the AP/PE Black Box space. For more information contact NWS Coordinator Steve Evans at steven dot evans at maine dot edu or at 207-581-3818.

If you have a disability that requires accommodation for a NWS event, please contact Ann Smith in the office of Disability Support Service, 121 East Annex, 581-2319 (Voice) or 581-2311 (TDD).

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207-581-1226.