Up Next | Poet Robert Adamson on Thursday, April 2

The New Writing Series, in collaboration with the Honors College, presents a reading by the Australian poet Robert Adamson on Thursday, April 2, at 4:30pm in the Allen and Sally Fernald APPE space in 104 Stewart Commons. The reading will be followed by a Q&A with the author. It is free and open to the public.

Robert Adamson is the author of more than twenty volumes of poetry, most recently The Goldfinches of Baghdad and Net Needle (both from Flood Editions).

American poet Michael Palmer (NWS S’05) says of Adamson: “Could it possibly be close to forty years ago when Bob Creeley and Robert Duncan first brought back the news about an extraordinary young Australian poet? I’ve avidly followed Bob Adamson’s work since those days, as he has probed the inner and outer landscapes of his environment with inspirited precision. ‘Praise life with broken words.’ Eye and ear, none better.”

.    Portrait Session at Toroga Zoo

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On Facebook? Consider joining the NWS group here.

The UMaine New Writing Series was founded in 1999 and is sponsored by the English Department and the National Poetry Foundation with support from the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, The Fiddlehead Fund, the New Writing Series Fund, the Lloyd H. Elliott Fund, the Milton Ellis Memorial Fund, the Honors College, the University of Maine Humanities Center, and the Cultural Affairs/Distinguished Lecture Series Committee. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the IMRC, and to donors Allen and Sally Fernald, for use of the Fernald APPE space.

If you have a disability that requires accommodation for a NWS event, please contact Ann Smith in the office of Disability Support Service, 121 East Annex, 581-2319 (Voice) or 581-2311 (TDD).

The authors who appear in the NWS write for adult audiences and make use of a wide spectrum of language and subject matter. We are happy to advise parents and secondary school teachers on which events may not be suitable for their children or students. Contact Series coordinator Steve Evans at steven dot evans at maine dot edu or at 207-581-3818 a few days in advance.

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207-581-1226.

Up Next | 2015 Grady Awards for Creative Writing

On Thursday, March 26, 2015, the New Writing Series celebrates the winners of the 2015 Steve Grady Awards for Creative Writing, who will read from their winning manuscripts. The event will be held at 4:30pm in the Allen and Sally Fernald APPE Space in 104 Stewart Commons and is free and open to the public. This year’s judges were Hoa Nguyen (poetry) and Jeff Jackson (fiction), both of whom read in the New Writing Series in the fall of 2014. The event will be hosted by Creative Writing faculty member David Kress. You’ll find brief biographical statements from the winners below.

Chris Becker wishes she could be represented by an amorphous mass instead of a photograph. Though born and raised in rural New York, she only recently realized the appreciation the experience gave her for the terrifying emptiness of small town spaces. Her ongoing body of scholarly and creative work investigates the impact of distance and closeness on human relationships. She is Co-Recipient of the Ulrich Wicks Distinguished Teaching Assistantship for 2015-2016, a member of the English Graduate Student Association, and a fiction editor for the 2014-2015 issue of Stolen Island. Her hobbies include sleeping and watching Law and Order reruns, frequently at the same time.

Taylor Cunningham is a third year student of English, Anthropology, and Folklore. She also poses as a philosophy student from time to time. Taylor is the creator and coordinator of a lecture series on Language and Culture, which addresses her love of human expression; the many forms it takes and the various communities that realize them. For nearly two years now she has been investigating the historical hermits of Maine under the term “hermitology,” but has only more recently noticed a growing resemblance to her wild, reclusive subjects.

Rose Engelfried is currently obsessed with fairytales, and with all the dark things they tell us about ourselves. A fiction writer, poet, playwright and essayist, Rose has published work in Garbanzo literary journal, The Citron Review, The Story Shack, Vine Leaves literary journal, YARN, Stolen Island, and Pacific’s Literary Undergraduate Magazine (PLUM). Rose won first place in Graduate Fiction for her stories “Tiger Moon” and “In the Woods,” both of which will appear in her MA thesis this spring.

Kristyn Gerow is an undergraduate English Major at the University of Maine. Her concentration is in creative writing, but she wishes she would concentrate more on her poetry technique in addition to fiction writing. She supplements her poetry deficiency by judging the student-run Poetry Slams. She is the fiction editor of the University’s 2014/15 undergraduate literary magazine, The Open Field. An avid dancer and writer, she hopes to translate her love of language and movement to others.

Joseph Linscott writes: “I’m a first year student in the Master’s program with a concentration in fiction. I’m a Maine native, and at the moment am interested in exploring, through my writing, the impact of the paper industry on Maine’s towns and people—influenced by writers like Mark Nowak, Muriel Rukeyser, and John Dos Passos. I also have fiction published in The Open Field.”

Hannah Ruhlin is a senior at the University of Maine majoring in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies with a double minor in Creative Writing and Sociology. She is the 2014-15 poetry editor for UMaine’s undergraduate literary magazine the Open Field. Both her poetry and her new ventures into fiction focus on personal experiences with gender, mental illness, feminism, and a host of other topics. When not deconstructing gender through her writing, she enjoys spending time with her cornsnake Hans Less.

Danielle Walczak is a New Hampshire native living in Maine. She studies journalism, creative writing and sustainable food systems at UMaine while serving as the Culture Editor of the Maine Campus. Her poetry has been published in The Open Field and she scored third place in UMaine’s poetry slam last fall. She is the winner of the 2014 Grenfell Prize for formal Poetry and the 2014 Grady Award for News Writing. Her interests are in literary journalism and being on mountains, whether it be skiing, hiking, or looking. She prefers beets above all vegetables in taste and color.

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On Facebook? Consider joining the NWS group here.

The UMaine New Writing Series was founded in 1999 and is sponsored by the English Department and the National Poetry Foundation with support from the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, The Fiddlehead Fund, the New Writing Series Fund, the Lloyd H. Elliott Fund, the Milton Ellis Memorial Fund, the Honors College, the University of Maine Humanities Center, and the Cultural Affairs/Distinguished Lecture Series Committee. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the IMRC, and to donors Allen and Sally Fernald, for use of the Fernald APPE space.

If you have a disability that requires accommodation for a NWS event, please contact Ann Smith in the office of Disability Support Service, 121 East Annex, 581-2319 (Voice) or 581-2311 (TDD).

The authors who appear in the NWS write for adult audiences and make use of a wide spectrum of language and subject matter. We are happy to advise parents and secondary school teachers on which events may not be suitable for their children or students. Contact Series coordinator Steve Evans at steven dot evans at maine dot edu or at 207-581-3818 a few days in advance.

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207-581-1226.

UMaine New Writing Series Spring 2015 Lineup

The New Writing Series presents innovative and adventurous literary programming on the University of Maine’s flagship campus in Orono on selected Thursdays at 4:30pm. All events are held in the Allen and Sally Fernald APPE Space in 104 Stewart Commons and are free & open to the public. Please mark your calendars, tell your friends, and come help us make it new!

February 19
AARON BURCH
Fiction writer | learn more
4:30pm in IMRC 104, Stewart Commons

March 19 < this event has been cancelled
BEN LERNER

Poet and fiction writer | learn more
Ben Lerner is a finalist for the Folio Prize & will be in London for the three-day festival leading up to the award on March 23. The NWS hopes to reschedule Lerner’s visit in the not-too-distant future.

March 26
GRADY AWARDS FOR CREATIVE WRITING
Winners of the 2015 Grady Awards in Poetry and Fiction

April 2
ROBERT ADAMSON
Australian poet | learn more
Cosponsored by the Honors College

April 9
JULIA ELLIOTT
Fiction writer | learn more

April 16
NORMA COLE
Poet and translator | learn more

April 23
BILL BERKSON
Poet and art critic | learn more

April 30
MA THESIS READING
Fiction by candidates for the Master’s Degree in English/Creative Writing

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On Facebook? Consider joining the NWS group here.

The UMaine New Writing Series was founded in 1999 and is sponsored by the English Department and the National Poetry Foundation with support from the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, The Fiddlehead Fund, the New Writing Series Fund, the Lloyd H. Elliott Fund, the Milton Ellis Memorial Fund, the Honors College, the University of Maine Humanities Center, and the Cultural Affairs/Distinguished Lecture Series Committee. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the IMRC, and to donors Allen and Sally Fernald, for use of the Fernald APPE space.

If you have a disability that requires accommodation for a NWS event, please contact Ann Smith in the office of Disability Support Service, 121 East Annex, 581-2319 (Voice) or 581-2311 (TDD).

The authors who appear in the NWS write for adult audiences and make use of a wide spectrum of language and subject matter. We are happy to advise parents and secondary school teachers on which events may not be suitable for their children or students. Contact Series coordinator Steve Evans at steven dot evans at maine dot edu or at 207-581-3818 a few days in advance.

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207-581-1226.

Next Up | Hoa Nguyen & Dale Smith on Dec 4

The UMaine New Writing Series presents a reading by poets Dale Smith and Hoa Nguyen on Thursday, December 4, at 4:30pm in the Allen and Sally Fernald APPE space in 104 Stewart Commons. The reading will be followed by a Q&A with the authors. It is free and open to the public.

Hoa Nguyen is the author of eight poetry books and chapbooks, including Red Juice: Poems 1998-2008 (Wave) and As Long As Trees Last (Wave). She lives in Toronto, Ontario where she teaches poetics at Ryerson University and curates a reading series.

Dale Smith is the author of the recently published book of poetry, Slow Poetry in America (Cuneiform); and a book of scholarship, Poets Beyond the Barricade: Rhetoric, Citizenship, and Dissent after 1960 (Alabama). He is on the faculty of the department of English at Ryerson University, Toronto.

Between 1998-2003, Nguyen and Smith edited the Austin-based independent poetry magazine and press Skanky Possum.

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On Facebook? Consider joining the NWS group here.

The UMaine New Writing Series was founded in 1999 and is sponsored by the English Department and the National Poetry Foundation with support from the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, The Fiddlehead Fund, the Lloyd H. Elliott Fund, the Milton Ellis Memorial Fund, the Honors College, the University of Maine Humanities Center, and the Cultural Affairs/Distinguished Lecture Series Committee. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the IMRC, and to donors Allen and Sally Fernald, for use of the APPE Black Box space.

If you have a disability that requires accommodation for a NWS event, please contact Ann Smith in the office of Disability Support Service, 121 East Annex, 581-2319 (Voice) or 581-2311 (TDD).

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207-581-1226.

The authors who appear in the NWS write for adult audiences and make use of a wide spectrum of language and subject matter. We are happy to advise parents and secondary school teachers on which events may not be suitable for their children or students: just contact the Series coordinator at steven dot evans at maine dot edu or at 207-581-3818 a few days in advance.

Next Up | Diane Cook on November 20

The UMaine New Writing Series presents a reading by Diane Cook, author most recently of Man V. Nature: Stories, on Thursday, November 20, at 4:30pm in the Allen and Sally Fernald APPE space in 104 Stewart Commons. The reading will be introduced by Gregory Howard and followed by a Q&A. It is free and open to the public.

Diane Cook’s fiction has been published in Harper’s Magazine, Granta, Tin House, Zoetrope, One Story, Guernica, and elsewhere. Her nonfiction has appeared in the New York Times Magazine and on This American Life, where she worked as a radio producer for six years. She earned an MFA from Columbia University, where she was a Teaching Fellow. She lives in Oakland, California.

NWS_F14_06_Cook_HS-CVR

“Masterful… Each darkly comic modern fable reveals our societal preoccupations—with status, sex, motherhood, belonging—for what they really are: thin veneers over our ever-present animal selves, ready to crack at the merest provocation. A book that’ll grab your attention and keep you thinking.” —Helene Wecker, author of THE GOLEM AND THE JINNI

“Here’s a good rule: If Diane Cook wrote it, read it.” —Man V. Nature in The Boston Globe

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On Facebook? Consider joining the NWS group here.

The UMaine New Writing Series was founded in 1999 and is sponsored by the English Department and the National Poetry Foundation with support from the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, The Fiddlehead Fund, the Lloyd H. Elliott Fund, the Milton Ellis Memorial Fund, the Honors College, the University of Maine Humanities Center, and the Cultural Affairs/Distinguished Lecture Series Committee. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the IMRC, and to donors Allen and Sally Fernald, for use of the APPE Black Box space.

If you have a disability that requires accommodation for a NWS event, please contact Ann Smith in the office of Disability Support Service, 121 East Annex, 581-2319 (Voice) or 581-2311 (TDD).

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207-581-1226.

The authors who appear in the NWS write for adult audiences and make use of a wide spectrum of language and subject matter. We are happy to advise parents and secondary school teachers on which events may not be suitable for their children or students: just contact the Series coordinator at steven dot evans at maine dot edu or at 207-581-3818 a few days in advance.

Next Up | Christopher Merkner on November 13

The New Writing Series presents a reading by Christopher Merkner on Thursday, November 13, at 4:30pm in the Allen and Sally Fernald APPE space in 104 Stewart Commons. The reading will be introduced by Gregory Howard and followed by a Q&A. It is free and open to the public.

Christopher Merkner’s first book The Rise and Fall of the Scandamerican Domestic was published in 2014 by Coffee House Press. He teaches creative writing at West Chester University. His work has appeared in Black Warrior Review, Cincinnati Review, Fairy Tale Review, Gettysburg Review, New Orleans Review, and Best American Mystery Stories. This is his first appearance in the New Writing Series.

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On Facebook? Consider joining the NWS group here.

The UMaine New Writing Series was founded in 1999 and is sponsored by the English Department and the National Poetry Foundation with support from the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, The Fiddlehead Fund, the Lloyd H. Elliott Fund, the Milton Ellis Memorial Fund, the Honors College, the University of Maine Humanities Center, and the Cultural Affairs/Distinguished Lecture Series Committee. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the IMRC, and to donors Allen and Sally Fernald, for use of the APPE Black Box space.

If you have a disability that requires accommodation for a NWS event, please contact Ann Smith in the office of Disability Support Service, 121 East Annex, 581-2319 (Voice) or 581-2311 (TDD).

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207-581-1226.

The authors who appear in the NWS write for adult audiences and make use of a wide spectrum of language and subject matter. We are happy to advise parents and secondary school teachers on which events may not be suitable for their children or students: just contact the Series coordinator at steven dot evans at maine dot edu or at 207-581-3818 a few days in advance.

Next Up | Poet Alice Notley on November 6

The New Writing Series presents a reading by the poet Alice Notley on Thursday, November 6, at 4:30pm in the Allen and Sally Fernald APPE space in 104 Stewart Commons. The reading, which is co-sponsored by the Honors College, will be followed by a Q&A and is free and open to the general public. Notley first read in the New Writing Series in November 2001; she returned for a brief residency in November 2004. Don’t miss out on this rare opportunity to hear one of the defining voices of contemporary American poetry as she returns to Orono for the first time in ten years.

Alice Notley has published over 25 books of poetry, including Culture of One (2011),  Songs and Stories of the Ghouls (2011), Grave of Light: New and Selected Poems 1970-2005 (2006), awarded the Lenore Marhsall Poetry Prize; In the Pines (2007); Disobedience (2001), awarded the Griffin International Poetry Prize; Mysteries of a Small House (1998); The Descent of Alette (1996); and many more. With her sons Edmund and Anselm Berrigan, Notley edited The Selected Poems of Ted Berrigan (2011) and The Collected Poems of Ted Berrigan (2007). Notley has received the Los Angeles Times Book Award for Poetry, an Academy Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America. She has also been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

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In November of 2011, Notley read in the University of Chicago’s “Poem Present” series; the event was introduced by Jennifer Scappettone (NWS S’14).

In February of 2012, Notley spoke with Michelle Naka Pierce, director of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics, as part of her residency at Naropa University. Their conversation touches on Notley’s relationship to languages other than English (the French of the Paris where she now lives, the Spanish of her childhood in Needles).

Just a few weeks ago, Eileen Myles (NWS S’10, S’01) delivered a keynote talk on Notley’s work at the Alette in Oakland conference organized by the Bay Area Public School. The three-day symposium was crowd-funded through an Indiegogo campaign.

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On Facebook? Consider joining the NWS group here.

The UMaine New Writing Series was founded in 1999 and is sponsored by the English Department and the National Poetry Foundation with support from the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, The Fiddlehead Fund, the Lloyd H. Elliott Fund, the Milton Ellis Memorial Fund, the Honors College, the University of Maine Humanities Center, and the Cultural Affairs/Distinguished Lecture Series Committee. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the IMRC, and to donors Allen and Sally Fernald, for use of the APPE Black Box space. For more information contact Steve Evans at steven dot evans at maine dot edu or at 207-581-3818.

If you have a disability that requires accommodation for a NWS event, please contact Ann Smith in the office of Disability Support Service, 121 East Annex, 581-2319 (Voice) or 581-2311 (TDD).

The University of Maine does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies: Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 101 North Stevens Hall, 207-581-1226.